Wooden coaster

Wooden coaster

CNC, Uncategorized, Woodworking
I experimented inlaying different woods to produce attractive design.  I decided to make a coaster so I could use it afterward.   I used my upcoming company logo as the basis of the design and decided on a 4" coaster diameter, plain round for now.   I used a 60 degrees v-bit, 16K RPM, 65IPM feedrate (could have gone faster but I went with safe values).  I then glued the two parts together, making sure there was glue in every corner to prevent lift-up / delamination later, used regulard yellow wood glue.  I then clamped overnight to allow to dry.  Next morning, I used my bandsaw to remove the backing of the inlay and then sanded everything smooth using 180, 320 and 400 grit.  I than applied 6 coats of glossy varnish, sanding with 600 grit in b...
Site is now running on an Azure Linux VM

Site is now running on an Azure Linux VM

Computer
I'm happy to report that I'm mostly done migrating my site from Shared GoDaddy to a dedicated VM on Azure! Knowing that I would need a 2nd site for my personal business (more on this soon), I spent the last few weeks reviewing hosting options for either shared or dedicated hosting.  I read a lot of review and finally made the jump to an azure VM. Reasoning Price-wise, for about the same amount I get a dedicated VM that I can do whatever I want with (multi site wordpress, services etc) Pros: Low cost (24 CAD$ / month Pay-As-You-Go or 9.95 CAD$ / month for 3 years) More consistent performance Can easily scale up / down resources (CPU + RAM) as needed Access to the full cloud infrastructure as needed (backups, virtual network, other VM, storage, tiered storage e...
Sieg SC4 Mini-Lathe!   (and a new project)

Sieg SC4 Mini-Lathe!   (and a new project)

CNC, Lathe
I (finally) bought a (slightly) used Sieg SC4 Mini-Lathe!    I installed the machine beside my milling machine until my new workshop is ready next year.   I spent the last weekend drawing & 3D Printing various lathe tools support in order to have a tidy setup for all the tooling. I'm planning to convert the mini-lathe to a CNC lathe in the near future.  I already started to shop around for various parts in order to establish a preliminary budget 2 x Nema 23 Stepper (279 oz/in), dual shafts so I can still manually operate the machine 2 x 4.2A @ 50VDC stepper drives 36V Power supply 1204 ballscrews for X/Y Allow for a future tool turret (ATC) prob. Nema 17 + few inputs  Encoder on the spindle (rigid tapping) MESA 6i25 + 7i76...
Spindle Coolant Flow Indicator

Spindle Coolant Flow Indicator

3D Printing, Electronics
Ok, it's been a while since I posted, doesn't mean I stopped working on the machine! One thing that I found is that I often open my coolant bucket to ensure the coolant is flowing.   So I decided that designing and machining a flow indicator would provide a good opportunity to experiment with full depth cuts / adaptive cutting vs slotting and multiple side machining.   I already machined the part last Sunday and will post the finished pictures tonight along with comments
Designing a dust collector

Designing a dust collector

Electronics
After working with wood and MDF, I quickly realized that I needed something to collect all the dust.  I couldn't fix a ready-made design so I grabbed some good ideas in existing design and rolled out my own. Requirements: Transparent enough to be able to see the spindle / work area Clamp-on spindle Removable vacuum hose - store away when not used Allow for long / short tool lenght Flexible bristles so as not to snag into the material Magnetic dust shoe to allow quick access to work area and different bristles lengths Cheap! " template="default" order_by="sortorder" order_direction="ASC" returns="included" maximum_entity_count="500"]
CNC Mill (late) Update

CNC Mill (late) Update

Computer, Electronics
it's been a while... I worked quite a bit on the machine and it is currently operational.  I'm still missing the cable chains (lost in the shipping - replacements underway).  The first parts that I machined with the machine where the aluminium parts needed to replace the 3D printed plastic parts. I have videos of the machine in operation that I'm currently editing to make a nicer video / presentation Here a pele-mele of pictures that I took lately " template="default" order_by="sortorder" order_direction="ASC" returns="included" maximum_entity_count="500"]
Z axis assembly

Z axis assembly

Computer, Electronics
I spent the last two evening finishing the plates for the Z axis and drilling missing holes on the backplate for the newly designed limit switches.  I also decided to use connectors for the limit switches and designed a bracket for it https://youtu.be/4MC9gMEZO4k I also received 2 replacement flexible coupling for the motors, this did solve a problem I had with the motors 'wobling' on their mount : the hole I had to enlarge on the coupling was not straight... I assembled the Z axis tonight and I was glad to see how everything went together without a hitch.  I will do the proper wiring of the motor over the weekend along with the limit switches.  Meanhwile, here's a short video of the Z axis moving (sorry for the audio, I will make a proper video so...
Z axis limit switches

Z axis limit switches

Electronics
I finally settled on using optical photo switches for all limit switches.  My reasoning is that optical switches should be more accurate and reliable than mechanical switches and there is no wear caused by friction as there is no contact. After a bit of research on digikey, I settled for https://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/tt-electronics-optek-technology/OPB472N11/365-1646-ND/1636911 which are small, inexpensive and can be used for all axis (different orientation needed).  I then designed a base that I will glue the switch in    Followed by adding the switches on the Z axis backplate and tweaking the Z nut adapter plate to provide barrier for the switches   I then proceeded to print the support and placed the order at Digikey....
Wiring and first motion

Wiring and first motion

3D Printing, Computer, Electronics
It's been a few days since my last post.  I made a lot of progress on the construction of the milling machine. Design and printing of various brackets and panels https://youtu.be/cpSZCr0v9j8   https://youtu.be/Jzw_BS4OWUU https://youtu.be/PUjdCl345Lk   I used T-Nuts + M5 screws to assemble the drives on the machine frame.  I also installed a wires guide to keep everything tidy.   I'm not sure how it going to hold up in regard to vibrations but I'll wait until the machine is up and running before making my mind.  I'm trying to keep the electronics embedded in the machine as much as possible.   I then assembled and wired the power panel.  I wanted to have separate switches for the the control / power sections. ...
Redesigning a stronger X Motor Mount

Redesigning a stronger X Motor Mount

Electronics
  Yesterday, I accidentally (AKA clumsily) hit the X motor mount which broke from the impact.  It was obvious that my first design wasn't strong enough so I decided to design a beefier one tonight.  I also accounted for the coupling which is slightly longer than the one I used when designed the machine. I then sent the job to the 3D Printer (0.3mm layers, 3 shells, 30% infill, 110mm/s low-quality print) https://youtu.be/17xRPOwXi7I   Then I threaded the holes for the screw and assembled the mount and motor on the YL plate